AAO Exam-CT 9: English (Reading Comprehension)

AAO Exam-CT 9- English (Reading Comprehension)

 0  163
AAO Exam-CT 9: English (Reading Comprehension)

1. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

The 27th session of the Conference of Parties (COP) is underway at Egypt’s sea-side city of Sharm el-Sheikh where, over two weeks, heads of government, diplomats, business heads, activists, journalists, and lobbyists will converge. The attempt is to inch ahead on a global rehaul of energy consumption to improve earth’s chances against catastrophic climate change. While every COP ends with a hard-bargain document, the essential principle remains constant: how to ensure that all countries contribute to paying for what it takes to avoid the consequences of global warming without compromising on economic development, while accounting for their historical responsibility in exacerbating the crisis. There are several countries, especially island nations, that stand to lose the most from global warming without having a role in causing it. Given that COP agreements are non-binding on the signatory member-states, and volte-faces not unusual — such as the United States unilaterally exiting the agreement only to join again — these meetings also serve as a forum for public posturing. Countries announce their commitment to lofty environmental goals but do little to execute the often-stringent measures that these entail because they potentially involve political blowback. However, COPs do serve as an effective nudge. Even a decade ago, the link between global warming and climate change had sizeable critics; now, no country challenges fundamental science. A fossil fuel-free future is the direction that the world is moving towards.

It is thus appropriate that COP27 is viewed as the so-called ‘implementation CoP’, to borrow a term from Sameh Shoukry, Egyptian Foreign Minister and President, COP27. Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable sources is expensive and the large developing countries (India, China, Brazil, South Africa) while committing to a carbon-free future also underline their right to rely on fossil fuels in the interim. While there is agreement that developed countries foot the bill, the bulk of the wrangling is over determining how the bill is paid. The ‘implementation COP’, India has said, must set out a transparent payment system and spell out how countries already reeling under climate disasters can be compensated. This will also mean greater transparency from recipient nations on how these investments measurably improve a transition away from polluting sources. Unlike Glasgow 2021, when ‘net zero’ or commitments to be carbon neutral were the flavour of the season, implementation COPs are unlikely to result in ambitious breakthroughs. Often, however, it is the unspoken and the subterranean that get the job done. COP27 must send the message, loud and clear, that be it war or peace, poverty or plenty, securing the world’s future comes at a price that only gets costlier every passing day.

Question:
Which of the following best explains the essential principle of every COP session?
  • To create a hard-bargain document.
  • Participation of every country to avoid the repercussions of Global Warming.
  • To tackle global warming without compromising on economic development.
  • Only 1 and 2
  • Only 2 and 3

2. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

The 27th session of the Conference of Parties (COP) is underway at Egypt’s sea-side city of Sharm el-Sheikh where, over two weeks, heads of government, diplomats, business heads, activists, journalists, and lobbyists will converge. The attempt is to inch ahead on a global rehaul of energy consumption to improve earth’s chances against catastrophic climate change. While every COP ends with a hard-bargain document, the essential principle remains constant: how to ensure that all countries contribute to paying for what it takes to avoid the consequences of global warming without compromising on economic development, while accounting for their historical responsibility in exacerbating the crisis. There are several countries, especially island nations, that stand to lose the most from global warming without having a role in causing it. Given that COP agreements are non-binding on the signatory member-states, and volte-faces not unusual — such as the United States unilaterally exiting the agreement only to join again — these meetings also serve as a forum for public posturing. Countries announce their commitment to lofty environmental goals but do little to execute the often-stringent measures that these entail because they potentially involve political blowback. However, COPs do serve as an effective nudge. Even a decade ago, the link between global warming and climate change had sizeable critics; now, no country challenges fundamental science. A fossil fuel-free future is the direction that the world is moving towards.

It is thus appropriate that COP27 is viewed as the so-called ‘implementation CoP’, to borrow a term from Sameh Shoukry, Egyptian Foreign Minister and President, COP27. Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable sources is expensive and the large developing countries (India, China, Brazil, South Africa) while committing to a carbon-free future also underline their right to rely on fossil fuels in the interim. While there is agreement that developed countries foot the bill, the bulk of the wrangling is over determining how the bill is paid. The ‘implementation COP’, India has said, must set out a transparent payment system and spell out how countries already reeling under climate disasters can be compensated. This will also mean greater transparency from recipient nations on how these investments measurably improve a transition away from polluting sources. Unlike Glasgow 2021, when ‘net zero’ or commitments to be carbon neutral were the flavour of the season, implementation COPs are unlikely to result in ambitious breakthroughs. Often, however, it is the unspoken and the subterranean that get the job done. COP27 must send the message, loud and clear, that be it war or peace, poverty or plenty, securing the world’s future comes at a price that only gets costlier every passing day.

Question:

Which of the following is/are NOT going to be present at the COP 27 meeting in Egypt, according to the passage?

A. Heads of government

B. Environment ministers

C. Activists

D. Journalists

E. Scientists

  • Only A and B
  • Only A, C and D
  • Only B and D
  • Only B and E
  • Only C and E

3. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

The 27th session of the Conference of Parties (COP) is underway at Egypt’s sea-side city of Sharm el-Sheikh where, over two weeks, heads of government, diplomats, business heads, activists, journalists, and lobbyists will converge. The attempt is to inch ahead on a global rehaul of energy consumption to improve earth’s chances against catastrophic climate change. While every COP ends with a hard-bargain document, the essential principle remains constant: how to ensure that all countries contribute to paying for what it takes to avoid the consequences of global warming without compromising on economic development, while accounting for their historical responsibility in exacerbating the crisis. There are several countries, especially island nations, that stand to lose the most from global warming without having a role in causing it. Given that COP agreements are non-binding on the signatory member-states, and volte-faces not unusual — such as the United States unilaterally exiting the agreement only to join again — these meetings also serve as a forum for public posturing. Countries announce their commitment to lofty environmental goals but do little to execute the often-stringent measures that these entail because they potentially involve political blowback. However, COPs do serve as an effective nudge. Even a decade ago, the link between global warming and climate change had sizeable critics; now, no country challenges fundamental science. A fossil fuel-free future is the direction that the world is moving towards.

It is thus appropriate that COP27 is viewed as the so-called ‘implementation CoP’, to borrow a term from Sameh Shoukry, Egyptian Foreign Minister and President, COP27. Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable sources is expensive and the large developing countries (India, China, Brazil, South Africa) while committing to a carbon-free future also underline their right to rely on fossil fuels in the interim. While there is agreement that developed countries foot the bill, the bulk of the wrangling is over determining how the bill is paid. The ‘implementation COP’, India has said, must set out a transparent payment system and spell out how countries already reeling under climate disasters can be compensated. This will also mean greater transparency from recipient nations on how these investments measurably improve a transition away from polluting sources. Unlike Glasgow 2021, when ‘net zero’ or commitments to be carbon neutral were the flavour of the season, implementation COPs are unlikely to result in ambitious breakthroughs. Often, however, it is the unspoken and the subterranean that get the job done. COP27 must send the message, loud and clear, that be it war or peace, poverty or plenty, securing the world’s future comes at a price that only gets costlier every passing day.

Question:

According to the passage, which of the following statements is/are true?

A. Global warming will significantly harm island nations.

B. The world is moving towards a fossil-fuel free future.

C. COP agreements are binding on the signatory member states.

  • Only A
  • Only B
  • Only A and B
  • Only B and C
  • All are true

4. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

The 27th session of the Conference of Parties (COP) is underway at Egypt’s sea-side city of Sharm el-Sheikh where, over two weeks, heads of government, diplomats, business heads, activists, journalists, and lobbyists will converge. The attempt is to inch ahead on a global rehaul of energy consumption to improve earth’s chances against catastrophic climate change. While every COP ends with a hard-bargain document, the essential principle remains constant: how to ensure that all countries contribute to paying for what it takes to avoid the consequences of global warming without compromising on economic development, while accounting for their historical responsibility in exacerbating the crisis. There are several countries, especially island nations, that stand to lose the most from global warming without having a role in causing it. Given that COP agreements are non-binding on the signatory member-states, and volte-faces not unusual — such as the United States unilaterally exiting the agreement only to join again — these meetings also serve as a forum for public posturing. Countries announce their commitment to lofty environmental goals but do little to execute the often-stringent measures that these entail because they potentially involve political blowback. However, COPs do serve as an effective nudge. Even a decade ago, the link between global warming and climate change had sizeable critics; now, no country challenges fundamental science. A fossil fuel-free future is the direction that the world is moving towards.

It is thus appropriate that COP27 is viewed as the so-called ‘implementation CoP’, to borrow a term from Sameh Shoukry, Egyptian Foreign Minister and President, COP27. Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable sources is expensive and the large developing countries (India, China, Brazil, South Africa) while committing to a carbon-free future also underline their right to rely on fossil fuels in the interim. While there is agreement that developed countries foot the bill, the bulk of the wrangling is over determining how the bill is paid. The ‘implementation COP’, India has said, must set out a transparent payment system and spell out how countries already reeling under climate disasters can be compensated. This will also mean greater transparency from recipient nations on how these investments measurably improve a transition away from polluting sources. Unlike Glasgow 2021, when ‘net zero’ or commitments to be carbon neutral were the flavour of the season, implementation COPs are unlikely to result in ambitious breakthroughs. Often, however, it is the unspoken and the subterranean that get the job done. COP27 must send the message, loud and clear, that be it war or peace, poverty or plenty, securing the world’s future comes at a price that only gets costlier every passing day.

Question:
Choose the statement about the passage that is NOT true.
  • The passage describes India as a large developing nation.
  • The use of fossil fuels is emphasized by Brazil and South Africa.
  • Egyptian environment minister will be the president of COP 27.
  • Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable energy is very expensive.
  • All are true.

5. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows:

The 27th session of the Conference of Parties (COP) is underway at Egypt’s sea-side city of Sharm el-Sheikh where, over two weeks, heads of government, diplomats, business heads, activists, journalists, and lobbyists will converge. The attempt is to inch ahead on a global rehaul of energy consumption to improve earth’s chances against catastrophic climate change. While every COP ends with a hard-bargain document, the essential principle remains constant: how to ensure that all countries contribute to paying for what it takes to avoid the consequences of global warming without compromising on economic development, while accounting for their historical responsibility in exacerbating the crisis. There are several countries, especially island nations, that stand to lose the most from global warming without having a role in causing it. Given that COP agreements are non-binding on the signatory member-states, and volte-faces not unusual — such as the United States unilaterally exiting the agreement only to join again — these meetings also serve as a forum for public posturing. Countries announce their commitment to lofty environmental goals but do little to execute the often-stringent measures that these entail because they potentially involve political blowback. However, COPs do serve as an effective nudge. Even a decade ago, the link between global warming and climate change had sizeable critics; now, no country challenges fundamental science. A fossil fuel-free future is the direction that the world is moving towards.

It is thus appropriate that COP27 is viewed as the so-called ‘implementation CoP’, to borrow a term from Sameh Shoukry, Egyptian Foreign Minister and President, COP27. Shifting from fossil fuels to renewable sources is expensive and the large developing countries (India, China, Brazil, South Africa) while committing to a carbon-free future also underline their right to rely on fossil fuels in the interim. While there is agreement that developed countries foot the bill, the bulk of the wrangling is over determining how the bill is paid. The ‘implementation COP’, India has said, must set out a transparent payment system and spell out how countries already reeling under climate disasters can be compensated. This will also mean greater transparency from recipient nations on how these investments measurably improve a transition away from polluting sources. Unlike Glasgow 2021, when ‘net zero’ or commitments to be carbon neutral were the flavour of the season, implementation COPs are unlikely to result in ambitious breakthroughs. Often, however, it is the unspoken and the subterranean that get the job done. COP27 must send the message, loud and clear, that be it war or peace, poverty or plenty, securing the world’s future comes at a price that only gets costlier every passing day.

Question:
Which of the following phrases can be used in place of the passage's use of the word "subterranean"?
  • below the standard
  • under the ground
  • over the bridge
  • below the level of awareness
  • less power

6. Directions: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the correct/most appropriate options:

China recorded its highest temperatures and one of its lowest levels of rainfall in 61 years during a two-month summer heatwave that caused forest fires, damaged crops, and hit power supplies, the national meteorological agency said. The average national temperature in August, 22.4C, was 1.2C higher than the seasonal norm, while average rainfall fell 23% to 82mm, the third lowest since records began in 1961, according to Xiao Chan, the vice-director of China’s national meteorological administration. He told reporters that 267 weather stations across China recorded their highest temperatures in history last month.

The heatwave between mid-June to the end of August was the “most severe” since records began in terms of duration, extent, intensity, and impact, said Xiao. 
The extreme temperature caused widespread drought in regions along the Yangtze River, southwestern China, and east and central Tibet. The persistent heat and drought caused forest fires and affected agricultural production, water resources, and power supply, Xiao said. The Yangtze is the world’s third largest river, providing drinking water to more than 400 million Chinese people, and is the most vital waterway to China’s economy.

Meanwhile, severe rainstorms hit various regions, including northern and southern China. Lightning, strong winds, and hail hit 13 provinces and regions, including Inner Mongolia and Yunnan, in August. The agency said it issued 65,000 weather alerts, mostly for extreme heat, in August – 26% up from the same month last year. Officials told a press briefing they expected above-average temperatures to continue throughout September, and warned that fire prevention and strategic agricultural plans must be made to cope with the situation.

The meteorological administration last month deployed 75 flights of cloud-seeding drones to induce artificial rain over 1.45m sq km in southern China to alleviate the drought. China has warned that extreme weather will probably persist in coming years as it tries to cope with the climate crisis and rising temperatures.

The record-breaking drought has caused some rivers in China – including parts of the Yangtze – to dry up, affecting hydropower, halting shipping, and forcing major companies to suspend operations. The loss of water flow to China’s extensive hydropower system has sparked a “grave situation” in Sichuan, which gets more than 80% of its energy from hydropower. Last month, the southwestern province of Sichuan said it would ration power supplies to homes, offices, and shopping malls, after having already ordered producers of energy-intensive metals and fertilizer to curb operations.

Question:
Choose the antonym of the word 'Persistent'.
  • Pertinacious
  • Tenacious
  • Irresolute
  • Insistent
  • Dogged

7. Directions: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the correct/most appropriate options:

China recorded its highest temperatures and one of its lowest levels of rainfall in 61 years during a two-month summer heatwave that caused forest fires, damaged crops, and hit power supplies, the national meteorological agency said. The average national temperature in August, 22.4C, was 1.2C higher than the seasonal norm, while average rainfall fell 23% to 82mm, the third lowest since records began in 1961, according to Xiao Chan, the vice-director of China’s national meteorological administration. He told reporters that 267 weather stations across China recorded their highest temperatures in history last month.

The heatwave between mid-June to the end of August was the “most severe” since records began in terms of duration, extent, intensity, and impact, said Xiao. 
The extreme temperature caused widespread drought in regions along the Yangtze River, southwestern China, and east and central Tibet. The persistent heat and drought caused forest fires and affected agricultural production, water resources, and power supply, Xiao said. The Yangtze is the world’s third largest river, providing drinking water to more than 400 million Chinese people, and is the most vital waterway to China’s economy.

Meanwhile, severe rainstorms hit various regions, including northern and southern China. Lightning, strong winds, and hail hit 13 provinces and regions, including Inner Mongolia and Yunnan, in August. The agency said it issued 65,000 weather alerts, mostly for extreme heat, in August – 26% up from the same month last year. Officials told a press briefing they expected above-average temperatures to continue throughout September, and warned that fire prevention and strategic agricultural plans must be made to cope with the situation.

The meteorological administration last month deployed 75 flights of cloud-seeding drones to induce artificial rain over 1.45m sq km in southern China to alleviate the drought. China has warned that extreme weather will probably persist in coming years as it tries to cope with the climate crisis and rising temperatures.

The record-breaking drought has caused some rivers in China – including parts of the Yangtze – to dry up, affecting hydropower, halting shipping, and forcing major companies to suspend operations. The loss of water flow to China’s extensive hydropower system has sparked a “grave situation” in Sichuan, which gets more than 80% of its energy from hydropower. Last month, the southwestern province of Sichuan said it would ration power supplies to homes, offices, and shopping malls, after having already ordered producers of energy-intensive metals and fertilizer to curb operations.

Question:
Choose the synonym of the word 'Alleviate'.
  • Aggravate
  • Assuage
  • Exacerbate
  • Intensify
  • Augment

8. Directions: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the correct/most appropriate options:

China recorded its highest temperatures and one of its lowest levels of rainfall in 61 years during a two-month summer heatwave that caused forest fires, damaged crops, and hit power supplies, the national meteorological agency said. The average national temperature in August, 22.4C, was 1.2C higher than the seasonal norm, while average rainfall fell 23% to 82mm, the third lowest since records began in 1961, according to Xiao Chan, the vice-director of China’s national meteorological administration. He told reporters that 267 weather stations across China recorded their highest temperatures in history last month.

The heatwave between mid-June to the end of August was the “most severe” since records began in terms of duration, extent, intensity, and impact, said Xiao. 
The extreme temperature caused widespread drought in regions along the Yangtze River, southwestern China, and east and central Tibet. The persistent heat and drought caused forest fires and affected agricultural production, water resources, and power supply, Xiao said. The Yangtze is the world’s third largest river, providing drinking water to more than 400 million Chinese people, and is the most vital waterway to China’s economy.

Meanwhile, severe rainstorms hit various regions, including northern and southern China. Lightning, strong winds, and hail hit 13 provinces and regions, including Inner Mongolia and Yunnan, in August. The agency said it issued 65,000 weather alerts, mostly for extreme heat, in August – 26% up from the same month last year. Officials told a press briefing they expected above-average temperatures to continue throughout September, and warned that fire prevention and strategic agricultural plans must be made to cope with the situation.

The meteorological administration last month deployed 75 flights of cloud-seeding drones to induce artificial rain over 1.45m sq km in southern China to alleviate the drought. China has warned that extreme weather will probably persist in coming years as it tries to cope with the climate crisis and rising temperatures.

The record-breaking drought has caused some rivers in China – including parts of the Yangtze – to dry up, affecting hydropower, halting shipping, and forcing major companies to suspend operations. The loss of water flow to China’s extensive hydropower system has sparked a “grave situation” in Sichuan, which gets more than 80% of its energy from hydropower. Last month, the southwestern province of Sichuan said it would ration power supplies to homes, offices, and shopping malls, after having already ordered producers of energy-intensive metals and fertilizer to curb operations.

Question:

Which of the following is/are incorrect according to the given passage?

A. 267 weather stations across China recorded their highest temperatures in history last month.

B. China said the extreme weather will not persist in the coming years.

C. The average rainfall in China has increased.

  • Only A
  • Both A and B
  • Only B
  • ​Both B and C
  • Only C

9. Directions: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the correct/most appropriate options:

China recorded its highest temperatures and one of its lowest levels of rainfall in 61 years during a two-month summer heatwave that caused forest fires, damaged crops, and hit power supplies, the national meteorological agency said. The average national temperature in August, 22.4C, was 1.2C higher than the seasonal norm, while average rainfall fell 23% to 82mm, the third lowest since records began in 1961, according to Xiao Chan, the vice-director of China’s national meteorological administration. He told reporters that 267 weather stations across China recorded their highest temperatures in history last month.

The heatwave between mid-June to the end of August was the “most severe” since records began in terms of duration, extent, intensity, and impact, said Xiao. 
The extreme temperature caused widespread drought in regions along the Yangtze River, southwestern China, and east and central Tibet. The persistent heat and drought caused forest fires and affected agricultural production, water resources, and power supply, Xiao said. The Yangtze is the world’s third largest river, providing drinking water to more than 400 million Chinese people, and is the most vital waterway to China’s economy.

Meanwhile, severe rainstorms hit various regions, including northern and southern China. Lightning, strong winds, and hail hit 13 provinces and regions, including Inner Mongolia and Yunnan, in August. The agency said it issued 65,000 weather alerts, mostly for extreme heat, in August – 26% up from the same month last year. Officials told a press briefing they expected above-average temperatures to continue throughout September, and warned that fire prevention and strategic agricultural plans must be made to cope with the situation.

The meteorological administration last month deployed 75 flights of cloud-seeding drones to induce artificial rain over 1.45m sq km in southern China to alleviate the drought. China has warned that extreme weather will probably persist in coming years as it tries to cope with the climate crisis and rising temperatures.

The record-breaking drought has caused some rivers in China – including parts of the Yangtze – to dry up, affecting hydropower, halting shipping, and forcing major companies to suspend operations. The loss of water flow to China’s extensive hydropower system has sparked a “grave situation” in Sichuan, which gets more than 80% of its energy from hydropower. Last month, the southwestern province of Sichuan said it would ration power supplies to homes, offices, and shopping malls, after having already ordered producers of energy-intensive metals and fertilizer to curb operations.

Question:
What is the central theme of the passage?
  • Relief from the heatwave in China.
  • China recorded its highest levels of rainfall in 61 years.
  • UN ups flood aid appeal as China enters ‘second wave of death’.
  • Climate change likely increased intense rainfall in China.
  • Most severe heatwave in China.

10. Directions: Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow by choosing the correct/most appropriate options:

China recorded its highest temperatures and one of its lowest levels of rainfall in 61 years during a two-month summer heatwave that caused forest fires, damaged crops, and hit power supplies, the national meteorological agency said. The average national temperature in August, 22.4C, was 1.2C higher than the seasonal norm, while average rainfall fell 23% to 82mm, the third lowest since records began in 1961, according to Xiao Chan, the vice-director of China’s national meteorological administration. He told reporters that 267 weather stations across China recorded their highest temperatures in history last month.

The heatwave between mid-June to the end of August was the “most severe” since records began in terms of duration, extent, intensity, and impact, said Xiao. 
The extreme temperature caused widespread drought in regions along the Yangtze River, southwestern China, and east and central Tibet. The persistent heat and drought caused forest fires and affected agricultural production, water resources, and power supply, Xiao said. The Yangtze is the world’s third largest river, providing drinking water to more than 400 million Chinese people, and is the most vital waterway to China’s economy.

Meanwhile, severe rainstorms hit various regions, including northern and southern China. Lightning, strong winds, and hail hit 13 provinces and regions, including Inner Mongolia and Yunnan, in August. The agency said it issued 65,000 weather alerts, mostly for extreme heat, in August – 26% up from the same month last year. Officials told a press briefing they expected above-average temperatures to continue throughout September, and warned that fire prevention and strategic agricultural plans must be made to cope with the situation.

The meteorological administration last month deployed 75 flights of cloud-seeding drones to induce artificial rain over 1.45m sq km in southern China to alleviate the drought. China has warned that extreme weather will probably persist in coming years as it tries to cope with the climate crisis and rising temperatures.

The record-breaking drought has caused some rivers in China – including parts of the Yangtze – to dry up, affecting hydropower, halting shipping, and forcing major companies to suspend operations. The loss of water flow to China’s extensive hydropower system has sparked a “grave situation” in Sichuan, which gets more than 80% of its energy from hydropower. Last month, the southwestern province of Sichuan said it would ration power supplies to homes, offices, and shopping malls, after having already ordered producers of energy-intensive metals and fertilizer to curb operations.

Question:
Why the meteorological administration deployed drones in southern China?
  • To keep an eye on terrorist activities, if any.
  • To keep an eye on thieves.
  • To keep an eye on its enemies.
  • To induce artificial rain.
  • To measure the atmospheric temperature.

What's Your Reaction?

like

dislike

love

funny

angry

sad

wow